the-pale-horseman:

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

I think you’re forgetting the best part. This is from Monty Python Live and Brian is pointing out all the wrong science in The Galaxy Song. Stephen appears, runs him over then trundles off, singing the song.

the-pale-horseman:

science-and-things:

hlaar:

So I’ve heard somebody wanted to see a gif of that moment when Brian Cox was ran over by Stephen Hawking. Here it is, I hope it loads.

This gif changed my life

I think you’re forgetting the best part. This is from Monty Python Live and Brian is pointing out all the wrong science in The Galaxy Song. Stephen appears, runs him over then trundles off, singing the song.

bitchussy:

halloween omg no this is beautiful 

(Source: chelsahhdelic)

ifollowfantasticblogs:

kissheronthehead:

100% sure this was intentional.

i have friends who work in retail and i can let you know that this is 1000% intentional
ifollowfantasticblogs:

kissheronthehead:

100% sure this was intentional.

i have friends who work in retail and i can let you know that this is 1000% intentional

ifollowfantasticblogs:

kissheronthehead:

100% sure this was intentional.

i have friends who work in retail and i can let you know that this is 1000% intentional

(Source: urbancookiecrumbs)

cleowho:

"Then you must be, er, well, how old?"

The Tomb of the Cybermen - season 05 - 1967

archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]
archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.
Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.
Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.
[via Colossal]

archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.

Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.

Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.

[via Colossal]

“You are really not a morning person.”

(Source: tyrells)

howprecious:

Teri Hatcher

honey, you don’t drink poison and wait for it to kill your enemy.

(Source: orangeskins)

retrogasm:

Marilyn

hectorish:

Everything is Hilson…

(Source: aaronmpaul)

zooey-fan:

I adore that dress

whittneydoll:

picturejockey:

tastefullyoffensive:

[kevinkelm]

This is cruel beyond measure.

I love people who invest their own money into pranks. It shows how dedicated they are.

queenpeletier:

To everyone who doesn’t blacklist #the walking dead on my blog tonight:

image

macbethoff:

The Complete Cornetto Trilogy

doctor who + autumn colors 

(Source: arthurpendragonns)